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3 January 2019

Wow!!! After 20 years we are still allowed the privilege of contacting Windsors inspirational teachers, colleagues, peers, friends and a plethora of other relationships!!!

This has enabled me to achieve a much more positive reflection than I had previously.  I would particularly like to thank Bill for making this possible and Geoff Hern for teaching me a more positive way of perception (once a teacher......)

While this brings me great joy I am also saddened when I look back at the entries from those that are no longer with us.
This just adds to the importance of us all appreciating the site and and valuing what we have. LOL 

Izzzi Forbes (B72-75)

          

     

4 January 2019

What a posting to start 2019 with. Many thanks Sebrof (Izzzi) for your kind words but  what you've got was always there. The usual lively, positive and appreciative Isabella (N.B.) whilst tinged with sadness for those no longer with us. Many of whom brought the site to life with their banter and postings. The best way to remember them perhaps is by keeping the site going since Bill can only post what he gets. Hint!! Sounds a bit of a cliche to write it but then remember my age!! I've said it a few times now but 'Many thanks Bill'.

Geoff Hern (M60-80)

        

      

5 January 2019

Hi Ffoeg Thank you for your kind and supportive words which I know are genuine and that makes them priceless.
It is true to say that I am usually lively, positive and appreciative nowadays.
However, if you speak to anyone who remembers me in my Windsor days (with a few exceptions) they would struggle to agree with you.

Anyway, I am a big fan of quiz programmes and follow the Chase big time. Mark Labett, the maths teacher, had never heard of this and I wondered if you had and could explain in to us all - 'the hairy ball theory'?
My interpretation would be that things stick to the hair and it grows and grows - maybe even snowballs? LOL iZZZZZI

Izzzi Forbes (B72-75)

         

    

12 January 2019

Hi to all who look in to this forum

I am really disappointed to see so few entries to start 2019.
Bill has worked really hard to keep this going for our benefit.
Please show your appreciation by posting on the site.
I don't mean to upset anyone but this entry is heart felt
LOL Izzzzzi

Izzzi Forbes (B72-75)

         

       

13 January 2019

I would hate to disappoint iZZZZi, so here I am, posting!

I was looking at an old diary from my school days, and it mentioned that I had "MOS" for dinner.  No, not some exotic creation of Mr Stirk's (who was in charge of our food in those days), but Member of Staff.  Whoever was the duty member of staff at lunchtime came and sat at one of the tables, and each table took it in turns to host whoever that was.  Not something we looked forward to!  I don't know if Geoff had something similar at the Boys' School?  Anyway, it meant some person (if it was a full table) might have to get shoved off to make room (me!  me!  please let it be me! ;-)) and the rest of us had to be on our best behaviour.  Did you still have that in your time, iZZZZi?  It seems it wasn't always a chore to be hosting "MOS", I have a comment in the diary that when Miss Edwards was MOS, we chatted about diets.  By the time I was 18, some of our staff were only about 6 years older than me.

Life in the north of Scotland continues to be enjoyable - recent local over-60s party, food and drink flowing, dancing to music very reminiscent of my youth!  The new extension to my house, I decided to lay the flooring, a bit of a mistake at my age - keep forgetting how old I am, as in my head I am still in the Lower Sixth at WGS.

Pamela Ross (StJ63-68)

           

       

14th January 2019

Hi Pamela
Great to here from you. Not sure if we had MOS in my time but remember having to sit at Matrons table which was no fun at all.
Glad to hear you are enjoying up north - ye canna whack it.
Take care OF yourself with that DIY!!!
Who was the headie when you were there?  Was Miss Waldron there?

Izzzi Forbes (B72-75)

        

     

16th January 2019

Miss Pearl Waldron was a Housemistress of Marlborough House at WGS for a number of years. I think that she returned to the U.K. under the '50' rule when teachers were no longer employed after that age. This changed later. I was told that she eventually married and opened a 'non-smoking'-B&B place. I knew her well and she was a very hardworking and caring housemistress. I think that Rina Blackman was her deputy for a while. Rina went on to become the headmistress of a very prestigious Girls' School in Peru.

Colin Hawthorne (M74-79)

         

      

16th January 2019

Happy New Year. I'm reminded of the Soprano's where one of the hoods remarks...'They just keep dragging me back in'... and I feel a tad like that when reading Pamela Ross commenting on her 'new' life in the frozen north. So much so, I am seriously thinking of decamping up to North Norfolk, better to enjoy the beaches of Holkham and area. I stopped short the other day, when reading The Guradian (SP! ED)where someone wrote that ...Happiness was reality without expectation... and I found that helpful and illuminating in thinking through how to best spend remaining years. In other words, better to reflect on what you have, rather than what you have not. And in that regard, I am seriously impressed, by a sense of appreciating what we have, because (I guess, without a Maths degree), we are still living an outstandingly lucky life (like 99.999999 etc%. compared to the rest of the world) with our experiences, all those years ago.
I haven't posted for a while and vowed not to do so again, but there are values one hopes in exchanging experience, if only it tells you 'get off your arse and move, such to enjoy today's reality. Thanks Pamela Ross!

 John Eustace (M59-62)

       

          

16th January 2019

Hi Colin, You surprise me on 2 counts
From my memory is Miss Waldron I doubt whether she retired on the 50 rule
She may have been a caring House Mistress but she certainly did not extend that to me.  I received a punishment from her at every opportunity and was one of those responsible for making my time at Windsor unhappy.
She also had a go at my sister which ended with my sister calling Miss Waldron a witch to her face!!!!

Izzzi Forbes (B72-75)

        

        

18th January 2019

Happy 2019 all. Hope we can get to 2020 with all hands on deck, healthy and happy. This retirement melarchy is interesting.

Tony Reilly (M73-76)

         
 

     

18th January 2019

Oh, dear  Izzzi ! You must remember that NOT all pupils or teachers were suited to the kind of 'Boarding School Life' provided by the Ministry Of Defence in the Hamm schools.  I had only been a schoolteacher for 6 years prior to my appointment as a male teacher at WGS (the post came with boarding duties too!) I do not recall you and I think that our paths did not cross. I worked in Service Children's Education Service in Germany for 20 years and then taught abroad for a further 16 years. What a pity that you had a bad experience with one or more of my professional colleagues at the time. I am sorry about this but one speaks as one finds. I dropped out of this forum some time ago. It was my worry that there was very little input from ex-WGS folk. However, I decided to comment once more. (probably a mistake). I would be delighted if there was a 'thread' about 'Escort Duty' for boarding staff and joint WGS/WBS events and occasions !

Colin Hawthorne (M74-79)

          

      

18th January 2019

Looking at today's weather forecast - we're no more frozen here in the north than most of the UK!  There's snow in them thar hills in Sutherland, 45 miles away across the Firth, but we have sunshine.  The sea helps to moderate the temperatures.

I was doing a bit of research a while back, and found that Miss Waldron was younger than I had expected - not really surprising, we all thought our teachers were ancient!  So it is actually quite possible she was hit by the 50 rule.  Some people just look "older" or more old-fashioned than their actual age.  Sadly, living in such close proximity, there were always going to be personality issues.  There were a couple of members of staff I didn't get on with, one in particular, who shall be nameless.  Proving her wrong was a great delight of mine - but to a certain extent, it was also a good "life" lesson, as we come across similar issues when we go out into the big wide world - personality conflicts.  

John - it is hard to dig yourself out of your nice comfortable "rut" quite so drastically as I did, but circumstances had changed since I moved to my previous home.  It would have been less hassle to stay, but a lot more stressful.  It's a bit like being a "brat" again, moving to a new home, new location, exploring what's available.  Mind you, when we moved with the army, we didn't have the amount of clutter I brought with me on my latest move.  A couple of jets flew over as we walked round the harbour today - presumably flying back to their base at Lossiemouth.  We still have forces based locally - and plenty of English who have chosen to settle in this part of Scotland, often as a result of having been posted here.  Nothing changes, eh?

The d-I-y is currently confined to knitting a pair of fingerless gloves, iZZZZi

Pamela Ross (StJ63-68)

        

     

18th January 2019

Just to say I was never an angel but certain staff at WGS brought out the worst in me which I genuinely believe was caused by the  antics of my sister in the few months she was there.  I don't think there were many teachers she did not upset and her untimely departure certainly made Miss Derrick freak.  Her report from WGS stated she 'was to sophisticated for school'.  She had previously boarded at a private school where etiquette and elocution lessons were on the cirriculum.  I think WGS was a bit of a come down for her.
She had a run in with a French teacher who said it was a fluke that she had interpreted a script he was trying to teach. He told her if she was so clever to stand up and read it to the class. She did so with the perfect French accent she had previously been taught.
There was an occasion when she told Miss Waldron she would cast a spell on her.
When she had been misbehaving (no idea what) the House Mistress suggested she was a 'lady of the night'.

To this day I still believe that I was subjected to puishment by certain staff as I was labelled by association.  I actually got to the stage where I thought if I am being blamed I might as well be doing it so I did.  I wonder how many 12 year olds have been in that situation? LOL iZZZZZi

Izzzi Forbes (B72-75)

         

      

!9th January 2019

I am attempting to understand the early life of Miss Jean E Luck who has recently passed away in England. 

I believe she taught at the Windsor Girls School around June or July 1964 based on some Army vaccinations she received around this time in Hamm, Germany. 

I realise it's a unlikely but wondered if you have any more information or ideally pictures of when she attended the school and her role there. 

Kind regards
John Harris

        

     

20th January 2019

Information for John Harris: 

1965 Ambassador states - Hillsborough House notes - at the end of the school year, we were sorry to lose our Housemistress, Miss Luck, who, being more fortunate than most of us, is now enjoying a World Cruise.

You will need to find some Hillsborough girls for more information!  She didn't teach me, so I'm afraid I can't help any more than that.  She is also down on the staff list of the 1964 Ambassador.

Pamela Ross (StJ63-68)

      

     

20th January 2019

Hi Colin,
I well remember doing Escort Duty at the start and end of terms; I was lucky enough to do the Berlin journey once. Interesting. I also remember a long journey in the opposite direction and being against the clock to be back in time for "Dining Out" in the Teacher's Mess that evening. 

Rae Mitchell(nee Cleverly) (M77-81)

          

     

21st January 2019

Colin.I can remember Edinburgh house birthday parties.We have a photograph from around 1979 of students and staff which includes Gary and Jean Coffin.Gary was army,stationed in Hamm and Jean was a WGS Edinburgh matron.We were all dressed up to the nines and the Jungle juice was flowing freely.Everyone seems to be having a good time.

Alan Hughes (E72-82)

         

         

21st January 2019

Did many escort duties of course Duesseldorf & Airport, Hannover, Hameln, the long trek to Goch several times but the most memorable was the Christmas dispersal at the end of my first term in 1960. The famous Ahse flood had made an emergency dispersal necessary. As a greenhorn I was given the 'easy' Ruhr trip stopping at places like Dortmund, Bochum etc and I was finally left with a group of about ten bound for Essen Hbf but somebody had read the timetable wrongly the train finished at Altenessen not the Hauptbahnhof. So it was off to the station restaurant for unscheduled pre-Christmas refreshment whilst the RTO - luckily their office was open - sorted things out. Wonder if anybody reading this was a member of that select group? Apologies but I think that I have posted this before. 
I seem to remember Pamela that at WBS the staff always sat at the Head of House table for meals - at least I did. As such it must have been the least sort-after table for the lads.
Willingen soon Rae? - a contact in Dresden, a bit further east of course, tells me that there is more than enough snow for everybody this year.

Geoff Hern (M60-80)

         

     

21st January 2019

Izzzi Forbes,  How I have enjoyed reading about yours and your sister's exploits.  I do not remember you but, by all accounts, I picture you both as fiesty, determined Scots!  Good show...G.

Geoffrey Pickles (E72-76)

        

    

21st January 2019

Geoff, I too, as greenhorn 10 year old, was on that Ruhr train after the famous 1960 flood. 
We were good boys, really :). I disembarked at Dortmund Hauptbahnhof and piled into the bus to go home to Brackel only to wait for what seemed like a freezing eternity for the driver to be found. Eventually arrived home to find Mum cooking pork chops for supper! Result!!

Malcolm Graham (E60-65)

        

      

21st January 2019

Was just watching a programme about a machine to reduce the severity of migraines and it reminded me of something at WGS.  One of the girls was in bed with a migraine - I was in the corridor being noisy as usual.  Miss Maynard told me to keep the noise down and stop being raucous,it was on my intelligent people that got migraines so I would never get one.
Well Miss Maynard I have never had a migraine but I'm not daft either.   LOL

Izzzi Forbes (B72-75)

         

      

22nd January 2019

Hello Mr Pickles, So glad you have enjoyed my tales of mischief and mayhem!!!!!
You were in E block at the same time as me - I wonder if our paths ever crossed - I think they must have but can't remember it.
Did you board with Thomas Ketchell?  I was paired off with him at a house party!!!!

Are you a fellow Jock? I used to be friendly with a quine called Wendy Pickles from Alloa.  She married a spug and became Mrs Hartley!!!
So the Pickles turned into a jar off jellie!!! You could not make that up!!!      LOL iZZZZZi

Izzzi Forbes (B72-75)

          

       

22nd January 2019

No trip to Willingen booked yet Geoff; virtually no snow there.
Colin, wasn't it at the combined girls and boys Marlborough Birthday "do" that the girls danced and the boys stood round the edges of the room?

Rae Mitchell(nee Cleverly) (M77-81)

        

    

23rd January 2019

in answer to tony Reilly`s post, i was a year behind you as we fought our way through the madness mayhem and fun of being marlborough inmates, i recently received a letter from the dept of work and pensions telling me i had ten years to plan my retirement, wahahaha i have been planing it since i left school, ( and the sneaky buggers have added an extra two years bringing it to 67 ) but two things pop to mind, number  1) i am still a young lad, and 2) i am way too busy to retire, i cant see myself with pipe and slippers looking out the window at my garden, and to be honest i don`t think i could handle that much free time,  ahhh life at windsor it was so easy, 

Gerry Gilmer (M73-77)

           

        

23rd January 2019

Yes, Rae. The combined house parties were often as you described. However, there were some 'co-educational' practices going on outside! The late Eric Harris and I were Marlborough staff and were tasked with occasional patrols of the grounds. Most of the activities were kissing and smoking. We had to gently reprimand and ease the couples back into the light. Mr Dunn served his famous 'Jungle Juice' at these parties. I have mentioned before that this was a kind of 'Pop'made from crystals and water. At one Marlborough Birthday party, a glass was spilt close to the centre candle display and it acted like petrol..... I had to throw a table cloth over it very quickly before it turned into a real bonfire. I guess it contained a lot of sugar. Ah, happy days!

Colin Hawthorne (M74-79)

            

       

23rd January 2019

Hello Izzzi Forbes, A 'Spug!)  I had no idea what the definition of Spug was, untill a few minutes ago!  A Spug, is a Jock's (sic) vernacular for a person from North-eastern England, or a sparrow, apparently.  One learns something new every day...  Actually, my paternal grandfather was from, Bradford, Yorkshire, before travelling around South America and the West Indies, where he worked in research as an entomologist, working in Tropical Agriculture - My father was born and brought up in Trinidad, before caming over to Britain for his education.  So, technically, I am Spug, two generations removed, an honorary Spug, lol!  I have no idea what the connection between Mrs Harly and Jellied eels, so would dearly like to add this knowledge as part of my education - your help would be appreciated, lol.  I will trade this for a few confessions to mischief of my own at WBS...  Also, I have no idea of your marital status, but had no intention of addressing you as Ms - horrid!!   Regards, G.

Geoffrey Pickles (E72-76)

         

     

23rd January 2019

Good evening Geoff P - Good to hear from you.  Language is a funny thing with different interpretation depending on your whereabouts.
In Aberdeenshire a quine is an unmarried woman - of which I am one- and always have been.  My better half of over 20 years is Mr Brown and there is no danger of me becoming maw Broon. A spug is the male equivalent of a quine.

Jellied eels? A jeelie jor is a jar of jam so Mr Hartley turned Wendy from a sour pickle to a sweet sticky conserve!!!

Well I thought I was a Heinz hound with a Spanish Christian name (?), Welsh middle name and a truly teuchter surname.  You beat me hands down with a heritage you should be proud to have.  Your Grandpa sounds like he had an amazing life for a man of his era WOW.

Now Geoff P spill the beans on your adventures at WBS......  LOL

Izzzi Forbes (B72-75)

         

      

24th January 2019

Whatever its origins, whether Hebrew, Italian or Spanish as suggested by various website, Isabella has been a popular name in Scotland for centuries - I have a few ancestors with the name, furthest back is, I think, Isabella of Mar who married Robert the Bruce.  I don't think it has the same kind of links which Clementina has, which is usually a Jacobite name!  (A few of those in my family tree, too).  You have a lovely traditional name, iZZZZi.  Mine was created by Sir Philip Sidney, a combination of the greek words for all and honey.  I hated my name till I discovered that!

I have the same abhorrence of the term "Ms".  I was Miss till I married, and Mrs ever since, even as a widow - but didn't change my surname - there's no law which enforces that, something I learned when working at the British Consulate General in Düsseldorf.  That was in the olden days, when we usually got our first passports at 16 and they were renewed after five years. Something most of us ex-Windsors will have had to do.  It was also before the UK joined the EEC, so passports tended to be full of interesting stamps as we travelled across the various European borders.

I remember Eric Harris when he first came to WGS - he was engaged rather than married at that point - I think male staff had to be married, it wasn't long before he complied!  I suppose, in an all-female environment, we were particularly aware of any males in our territory.

You've had an interesting family history, Geoff (Pickles) - something we have all been lucky to have enjoyed as children, but we tend to take it for granted at the time.  Also, the world has changed so much, not sure I would want to do it at this time in history.

Gerry Gilmer - what makes you think us retired folk have time to sit on a sofa with slippers on?  Retirement is when you do all the stuff which you couldn't do because working for a living got in the way!

Pamela Ross (StJ63-68)

          

        

25th January 2019

Hello boys and girls. Tis me again. Only one post last year as my age, previous lifestyle and lack of health and safety protection in my first few years of working (horrible word) have finally caught up with me. With the encouragement and help of Joanne Hurley (nee Williams), I have endured the casual carelessness of the NHS. Before anyone remonstrates with me about that wonderful institution let me tell you a story. Five times my right lung collapsed due to emphysema, (work related), all they did was shove a tube in my chest to drain out the crud (two days each time) and pack me back off home.

One procedure and two ops to remove a third of the lung some five months later.... Discovered I have heart failure, (ICD now also fitted), liver problems due to a dodgy gall bladder, extremely painful when it plays up, (still to be removed after three episodes) and kidneys playing silly bu**ers. Oh, and a blood clot! The staff at Lister hospital have a nickname for me now...Dead Man Walking (I wasn't given the name of Dances With Wolves on account there is a distinct lack of them around Biggleswade to dance with)... However, I like to think that because I was made to be somewhat independent at WBS and having to harden up or sink, I have found in me the right attitude to keep my sense of humour and just get on with it. No regrets or remorse.

Some of it is inherited and some my own or previous employers fault but I still ride my Harley (though a bit painful dipping into the potholes of our wonderful road system), drive my vintage Mondeo (just got my licence back after a six month suspension after having the ICD fitted) and can now manage a two mile walk, although a bit on the slow side. Most of my time is now spent in various clinics being stuck with needles etc. No longer allowed to fly so holidaying on Fuerteventura with a cousin is out, so too my plans to live out there as the hospital doesn't cover all the problems I have and indeed the wife's type one diabetes. Right pair eh? Still trying to tie down one Mr Dave Halsall for further drinks and laughs. Still going out gigging. Life goes on. I'm still standing and that's good enough for me. But what a bloody awful year....

Nige Hoar (S71-74)

        

        

25th January 2019

Hi Pamela. My name is a source of annoyance, amusement and beauty.
There are many variations in pronounciation and it can get quite frustrating.  My mother insists in calling me Isobel which I hate.  People from the islands call me Ishbel of Ishabel.  My friends call me iZZZZi which I like in social situations.  I used to be just Isabel until a manager announced to the team that my name was Isabella and that was what I was to be called (I had no say in it) and it has stuck at that ever since wherever I have worked.
A woman I worked for took all the staff out for Christmas dinner.  We went to an Italian restaurant where the waiter loved my name and treated me like the bee's knees all through the meal!!! The boss was not impressed as she wanted to be the queen.   Her hee hee!!!

A couple of years ago Isabella became very popular for babies.  Apparently because of a cartoon witch.  WHO WHO calls their child after a witch???  Dearie me jings crivens and help ma boab!!!  LOL

Izzzi Forbes (B72-75)

        

      

27th January 2019

I thought that I might respond to a couple of these messages. Nige Hoar, what a most terrible list of health issues you have. You suggest that you can put up with your multiple illnesses due to your short experience as a pupil at WBS? IMPLANTABLE CARDIOVERTER DEFIBRILLATOR (IDF) is not only a winning score in 'Scrabble' but a serious piece of kit in your chest. You say that you are 'gigging'....does that mean playing the guitar ? Very best wishes with your ongoing struggle.
  Izzzi, (never sure how many 'z's in your name!). I can speak German and French and as a student, I passed my Latin 'O' level......however, I have no idea what ...'jings crivens and help ma boab' means ! Perhaps, you could enlighten the readership on this statement ?

Colin Hawthorne (M74-79)

        

      

28th January 2019

Hi Colin, I'm glad to see us Windsorites can still educate each other in things that are important!!!

Jings and crivens are auld Scottish words to express mild surprise.  Helpmabaob was used in 'The Broons' and 'Oor Willie's comics to express mock surprise.  (Hence the reason I will never be maw Broon). These comics are printed by Johnston Press which originates in Dundee and the expression is probably Dundonian based - they have a language all of their own which many Scots struggle with.  

I absolutely love local dialects and always try to determine the origins of those which are not local.  This can upset folk if you get it wrong - The war Of the Roses.

When I told someone they were from the Brocht they were surprised I knew the accent.  Fraser burgh is a small town way up north!!!!

I absolutely respect the Islanders and Welsh who support and maintain the their origins.  Excellent!!!

Unfortunately many youngsters do not understand old local words as they have moved on to modern expressions.

Local dialect is very useful when working with the elderly as it is language they relate to and great for reminiscing.
Jings is a good replacement for swearing.  Youngsters say Falkirk which is the town we live in.

I remember Miss Maynard chastising me for swearing and suggesting I said 'soap powder' instead.  I thought she was absolutely mad at the time but it taught me something I still use today. There are better and more expressive words to use!!! By Jings!!!    LOL

Izzzi Forbes (B72-75)

          

        

28th January 2-19

Hello Izzzi, Google has nothing to return from searching for your definition, so, lol, youre reply has been an hilarious source of amusement!  As for my Heritage, I wish there had been a number of down-to-Earth members of my famiuly around when I was a child.  It was rather a seen, but not heard, situation visiting family.  However, upon clearing my father's effects, some of my grandfather's papers came to to my notice, reminding me of a conversation we had aboiut 'Cuckoo Spit' during a walk we made together, where he picked out Cuckoo spit resting on a blade of grass.  I had no idea at the time, that he had discovered a species of the Froghopper, to give them genus their correct name, in the West Indies.  I made an online search, and found his paper lodged with National History Museum:  http://www.nhm.ac.uk/resources/research-curation/projects/chalcidoids/pdf_X/Pickle932.pdf

Geoffrey Pickles (E72-76)

        

      

28th January 2019

IZZZIE - aye, 'The Sunday Post' with 'The Broons' and 'Oor Wullie' was sent to me at WBS nearly every week by my mother. My parents had it on order from The Church of Scotland in Dortmund and when they had finished with it, into the post it went! The same Church of Scotland where I bought my first Airfix kit, a Sopwith Camel, and where I had my first full bottle of Coca-Cola all to myself! Happy Daze :).

Malcolm Graham (E60-65)

       

      

28th January 2019

Colin Hawthorne...I firmly believe that at the age of 12 when one starts to learn about life in general, you tend to pick up certain traits due to your surroundings and influences. E.G. If you're brought up in a slum, able to carry a gun and taught to have no fear of prison, you're going to live that life. Likewise, if you're dumped in a boarding school miles from home and told to get on with it, you make of it what you can. I thoroughly enjoyed my time at WBS for the most part, the lessons were spot on, the teachers strict but fair, my mates all good people. I was certainly no saint but I listened and learned and hardened up without realising it.  
We returned to the UK just before my 15th birthday, I finally left home at the age of 16 and fended for myself. I got a flat in Nottingham (it was so easy in those days). The old man got another posting out of the country soon after so I had no back up anyway. This gave me the continuing attitude to 'suck it up' and get on with whatever was happening, thus to this day, I have no fear or apprehension in most things but particularly in my health struggles. I trust the doctors to do the right thing (even though sometimes they get it very wrong)... so yes, at an early age and for just a few short years, my experiences at WBS taught me much and I continued in the same vein thereafter.  
As for the gigging mentioned, I used to do security, merchandising, stage management and drive bands all over the EU in between doing regular jobs as an HGV driver. (again, this has all had to stop due to the ICD. Basically I have had to retire). Like I said before, my life style has led to the issues I now have but I have no regrets, it's what I wanted to do at the time, I loved every minute of it and I'm still plugging away at life and living. It's what we're here for, right? This ex pupil ain't for giving up. Then or now. Very soon the wife and I are off to Portugal to look at living out there, a good local hospital being the number one priority....

Nige Hoar (S71-74)

        

     

30th January 2019

Hi Geoff P, I had a read at your Granpas research document and it was really interesting but I have to say the intricacies of the Froghoppers anatomy were a bit too look much to cover in detail.  Beasties give me the wheeby jeebies!!!

I am glad you find my posts entertaining there is no point in posting if nobody reads them.
My other half would say 'you try living with her, take her if you want her'.  BUT he knows his bread is buttered on both sides with a big dod of jeelie in the middle!!!

The girl I work with is a bit loopy as well and we bounce around at work.  If one of us is off the auld yins ask where the other one is.
Our quality of care is measured in smiles and it is a bad call if we don't achieve them.  I would like to stress we do actually work and get the job done but it is only half done if only the practice tasks are completed.
If you want a laugh come and work with me it's the best job I've ever had and I have an extensive and varied CV!!!!! LOL 

Izzzi Forbes (B72-75)

        

             

30th January 2019

Nige Hoar, Many thanks for this chunk from your autobiography along with your philosophy of life. Your fortitude is quite remarkable and also the fact that you owe it to your school years at WBS. I worked as a schoolteacher overseas for 36 years and on two occasions met young male teachers who had previously been boarding pupils at WBS. They were not complimentary about their experiences in Hamm. Portugal is very beautiful and I imagine that your travel arrangements are by car and sea? You say that you are not able to fly. I have been to Madeira on a number of occasions and it is a most beautiful Portuguese island with a thriving British Ex-Pat community. However, if you have mobility and other health concerns, you might want to consider the mainland as this island is mountainous and full of steep climbs.  Best wishes.

Colin Hawthorne (M74-79)

            

    

30th January 2019

Hi I'm trying to trace two school friends, Kevin Sawyer and Sharron Johnston, both were in Marlborough House, around the years of 1975/76/77, would welcome any info please, Thank you.

Deborah Allen (M72-78)

        

     

31st January 2019

I was just reading IZZZZi's story about her name and it reminded me of my very early days at WBS in 1965 which has had a lasting effect on my name..  My given first name is Martin (which I am fine with) but discovered when I moved to Germany (in 1964)that there were family's from all over the UK (many from Newcastle..) all living in close proximity & I quickly discovered that 'Martin' suffered badly from the various regional dialects..  
I had the nickname 'Mo' from age 2 or 3 from my parents after a local Hastings street called 'Martineau Lane'  I was martineau for a while and this quickly shortened to Mo.
So, fast forward to an early dining room experience at WBS and I guess I was just 11 years old.  I seem to recall the dining tables had a mix of many different years with the eldest sat at the head..
On this occasion this 'senior' boy went round the table asking our names generally followed by some derogatory comment and a chuckle with his cohort..  When it came to my turn I decided to go with 'Mo' to which he burst into laughter and said 'that means Homo..haha' Not really understanding what he meant I piped up.. It's 'MOE' with an E on the end.. This seemed to placate (or confuse) him and he moved on to the next victim..  'Graham..? That means homo..haha  and so it went on..
But move on 50 years and I kept the E.. All I get now is.. 'I thought your name was ..'Maurice.. Maureen.. Moshe..'  What that got to do with Martin?..  Well, there's this street...

Martin Chamberlain (E65-68)

          

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