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5 March 2017

Got an OU essay to do 'Why do so many people with mental health problems end up in prison?'

I have been in two incarceration centres - one as a volunteer with CAB and the other on NHS business.

Wondered id any ex Windsors worked in the prison service and could offer any first hand info (confidentiality upheld)

Here's hoping....................

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

5 March 2017

I'm saddened and somewhat surprised, that the tone of late appears slightly negative towards life at W.B.S. We were very lucky people to have the good fortune to have turned up in such places as W.B.S. Yes, there were multiple faults and some strange events but overall, I doubt anyone left a worse person than they entered. Staff aside!
Only this week, did I have time and trouble to instruct my new housekeeper on the skills of hospital corners and how I wanted these to be in future, on my bed! 48 years later! Thanks Frau Carstens!
It really ought to be time to run another Newbury before Hern pop's his clogs! Volunteers? John

John Eustace (M59-62)

5 March 2017

Chris Crawford,

We were contemporaries in Hillsborough. My apologies for not being able to put a face to the name. Perhaps you could remind me.

I was in the 5th Form when I arrived and was in the dorm at the far end of the 2nd floor corridor. Just before the prefects' dorms. In the next year (Lower 6th) I became a House Monitor and then a House Prefect sharing a dorm with Mick Green.
In my final year (Upper 6th) I became Head of House and had a single dorm in the annex that previously contained staff flats.

Look forward to hearing from you.

Dave Naylor (H64-67)

6 March 2017

Izzzi

Just to let you know after 35 years in benefits/welfare reform I have just completed a CAB course - was great!

Looking forward some doing some work in Hackney

Christine Willmott (M77-80)

6 March 2017

I must add a few comments to John's (Eustace) input with the reference to more recent postings being somewhat negative. In general those who attended Windsor seem to have got through it, moved on in life and took their experiences both good and bad, as part of their life journey. Some former pupils, me included, may have toughened up during the course of lifes journey and unknowingly have 'benefited' from their experiences there. However, many of my experiences at WBS were unecessarily traumatic and a shock to the system after having moved through other schools prior to WBS without any qualms. People may have left the school worse for the experience and without raking over old coals, I have covered some of those aspects in my few previous postings. I repeat (sorry) some thoughts mentioned before, on WBS experiences regarding the limited number of postings from pupils around my era and that in itself may be indicative of the reluctance of them to rise to the surface because of their similar memories. Marlborough seems to have a host of former pupils posting comments and that may suggest a happy House, whereas there are next to no postings from Caernarvon, my House, certainly from the time I was there.


Thank you Geoff for the memory of Granville Watson, that name does ring a bell with me. Maths was not my best subject, but I managed to get through it.
I remember the exam marking system where as well as receiving your actual mark in the exam, there was a colour coding system applied to it as well. Red was given for effort and good work, Pencil (grey) was given for 'did his best' or average and the worst one was a Blue which was given for lack of effort (apparently) even if your marks were a pass. If you got a blue you were considered for a possible belting, as the logic was corporal punishment helps your brain work better.
I remember Welsh Rarebit quite often being on the late afternoon break before 'Activities' and this was put out in the Dining Hall to keep you going until the main evening meal.


Gaffers Pie which has been mentioned a few times, was my favourite. Much to Frau Drabble or Frauline Maeir's grumping (they oversaw my allocated dining table), I had over the course of the term agreed to swap a food item I did not like for someone elses Gaffers Pie and eventually I had about five or six pies (squares) sitting on my plate at one sitting. Surprisingly it was tolerated by the two House Matrons and that was one of my good memories.
The 'Activies' I mentioned earlier where compulsory attendance outwith the school learning day to various sporting activities for an hour or so as well as more sedate subjects. I think a minimum of two 'activities' over each week were required before evening meal and then the dreaded 'Prep'. More thoughts next time after some head scratching.

Dave Gray (C59-61)

7 March 2017

OK, I admit it, it's been a while since I've posted. I've just spent a couple of hours reading through the last couple of months posts, a few good memories and even more chuckles.
I could write a book on my memories but never will, who would read it?
Anyway, the reason for the post is to point out that a mini-reunion is happening in May near Birmingham and although I've asked the question on the society's Facebook site without reply, is there anyone going from the sixties?

Patrick Docherty (S66-70)

7 March 2017

I too must support John Eustace's comments on the positive side of Windsor. I do remember you John, but I left at Christmas 1960. I was in a dorm with roger West and Roy Thompson, opposite Pete Leggit and Trevor Golds rooms. Mike Evans was a prefect, for whom I fagged for a term. I too bear the marks of Scofield's authority, most of the time not deserved. However, The experience of Windsor ( and previously Plon), gave me independence and taught me so much about life, that has stayed with me all my working life. I would not have missed it for the world. At 71, I am still working as a Consultant at Airports for a couple of blue chip Companies, and respected for my knowledge and handling of Projects, and much of that came from those schools. I once met Roy Edmeades at a rugby do, and was really interesting to hear the staff side of things at the school. at the time he was Deputy Head of Burford school. Mrs Joliffe taught me maths and my knowledge of maths has stood me i
n good stead in my professionals role. Having said that, a Lady at my wife's work, asked if I would help her understand a question on her accounts paper, and I have failed. so this is for Geoff Hern!
Y = 100 x 8 ( to the power of -0.3219) The answer is 100 x 0.512 = 51.2 hours. I am afraid even with the internet, that has flummoxed me!
By the way, I remember Pete Leggit jumping 22 or 24 feet in the long jump?

David Lister (M59-60)

8 March 2017

All, In reply to Izzzi's post 28 Feb 2017, I am a sneaky peeker who posted the last comment in October. Due to the fact it raised no response from anybody, not even Mr Hern, I figured that this was just a lonely hearts gathering!

Kevin Murkin (B73-74)

8 March 2017

Just read post from Bill Craswell, i remember that tank ride, brilliant,the officers (teachers)had left us for no reason, so we got bored.We saw this tank with it`s crew sat with a brew going, and someone had a chat with them next thing we`er piling on it and off, up and down the wood line shouting at the"enemy". And I was on it to, sat in a big patch of oil and messed my BD up, gutted. Remember being in the tent in the wood and it rained during the night. The channel dug around the tent wasn`t deep enough and we got flooded, mine was the only pale-arse not to get wet,the smirk was wiped of my face as i rolled it up and the ground moved with all the insects, still cringe. we where guests of the 2nd Battalion R.N.F. Remember sleeping out on the sands with the P.C.(Saladins) During the night a squaddie dragged a lad up by the scruff of his neck shouting and pointing a rifle at his head, telling we were all dead and useless when this little stout scots lad creeped up behind him and took the smile of his face, wish i could remember his name, taught me to swim.He unlike we, had dug a pit further out.Liked him alot.A soldier gave me his hackel, still got it.Thanks for that Bill, maybe we talked.

Brian Swanson (H63-65)

PS Remember PEG LEG the ghost pilot.

8 March 2017

H I John Garnett

Thank you for your offer of help with my essay which I would greatly appreciate.
Apologies for the delay in responding - my work/life balance has been shot to ribbons since starting my new job.

The course I am doing focuses on the social, economic, environmental and political aspects of society that affect mental health.
How do these contribute to why people end up in prison?
Is there an element of 'safety and security' in prison for them?
Do more black people go to prison through stereotyping?

So many questions - you hear the news and read the text books - but what is the reality of it all?

With kind regards iZZZZi

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

P.S. Of course Bill can facilitate the exchange of E-mail addresses - THANK YOU Bill

8 March 2017

Hi Pamela,

Thank you for your offer of help which is greatly appreciated and would definitely remain confidential.
Apologies for the delay in responding - my work-life balance has been shot to ribbons since starting my new job.

The course work focuses on the social, economic, environmental and political aspects of why people end up in prison. There is so much on ethnicity (blacks), gender, drugs, etc.

I am not sure if that simplifies things too much?


You hear the news and read the course work but non of this gives the reality experience.

I am sure anything that you can share with me would be really helpful.

With kind regards iZZZZi

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

 

9 March 2017

Hi Ffoeg.

I sincerely hope you are not ready to pop yer clogs as John suggested - you have so much more wisdom to share with us all (so much more enjoyable than maths me thinks!!!!!)

Hi Christine,

I hope you enjoy volunteering at CAB as much as I did - it is a really worthwhile and valuable experience. I have also volunteered in charity shops and at The Scottish Council on Alcohol. The latter was helpful to those who came willingly but unfortunately many came because they had been sent by their employers or the courts and had no intention of changing their lifestyle. Compliance not choice - usually a waste of time and appointments that others may have benefitted from.

Hi Dave and John,

One mans meat is another mans poison - while Dave loved Gaffers Pie it was my worst nightmare as I had to raid my tuck box for fuel!!!!! While John thought Windsor was a great school I can genuinely empathise with Dave as it was not a good experience for me.
Dave and I had very different reasons for our less positive memories but I can say that it has impacted on me throughout my life. Fortunately that wise auld dude Geoff Hern has helped me to see a more positive view through this forum.

Hi Kevin,

It is great to see your entry and hope to read more from you.
This is not just a lonely hearts club but a forum that enables ex Windsorites to share memories and experiences, both good and bad, laugh, cry, learn from and help each other, etc,....................

THANK YOU to those who have responded to my request for help with my essay - it is really appreciated.

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

9 March 2017

I'm slightly surprised not to have been corrected by the great maths master on the years since I had to do hospital corners. I wrote 48, when 71 - 17 = 54 Right GH? I don't recall who was my maths teacher; but I do remember GH sympathizing with my swollen gum believing it to be a sore tooth, when reality was a gobstopper.
As for opening up a debate on the strengths and weaknesses of life in these schools I'm glad I did, but saddened to read not all shared my rosy view, but I suspect those early 60's years were of the best of times for the schools too

John Eustace (M59-62)

9 March 2017

With reference the John Eustace's recent post. I joined Marlborough a couple of years after John left. My first year in the school was traumatic, after three secondary schools in as many years I was to repeat my 3rd year. On reflection over subsequent years I realise I made many mistakes and errors of judgement, but found the stability of five years in one school eventually proved to be a blessing. It is perhaps to be expected that I view my time at WBS as a happy time and like John I put that down to the House and the Housemaster, PMK. I count myself lucky to be ex Marlborough, meeting up with several M boys for a reunion, to be repeated again this year. There are many things I would like to redo from my time at the school but still glad I was there.

Dave Hodgson (M63-68)

9 march 2017

Hi John,

I was amused that you noted 'the great maths master' Mr Hern (now even greater philosopher) did not pick up on 'the attention to detail in your calculation.

I was even more amused that you see the early 60's as the best time for the schools. You attended from 59-62 and David Gray was there from 59-61 - you might even have known him?

My job is caring for the elderly, many of whom would be in your peer group, is interesting because they are such a diverse sub-culture of society. Their life experiences gives them their 'personhood' which makes the concepts of person and relationship centred care challenging and rewarding. It is for this reason that I enjoy going to work - it would be really boring to visit 'clones'.

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

10 March 2017

Time to reply. John no I did not pick up on your lack of arithmetic ability but I did notice, and was too polite to comment upon of course, your use of an apostrophe in pops - what's it doing there? Maurice Hallworth and Henry Robertson would not be impressed.
Sebrof and Christine and all those who responded to Izzzi's plea for help. (NB the use of the apostrophe John). The question could be asked 'Why do so many of those who went to Windsor give up so much time to helping others?' Surely Sebrof not another positive thing to come out of the WGS/WBS experience? Another thing Allebassi, me? A philosopher? I hardly think so. Merely age.
Dave Lister Sorry I have no idea. The maths seems OK but where do the strange power -0.3219 and the hours suddenly come from? Sorry I don't remember you but then I was young at the time. Sheila Jolliffe along with Joe Duffield and John Howard were all part of Granville Watson's Maths Dept that 'wet behind the ears' Hern joined in 1960.
Good to see a post again from Dave Hodgson. I totally agree about PMK. As I've said on here before he was one of the old school. Utterly devoted to his role as Housemaster and in the many years that we worked together always supportive and we agreed upon most things but especially in the fact that house duty could not be done properly from the study or even in the house at times.
And Kevin keep posting. It's not a lonely hearts club. This month's (apostrophe again John) wide-range of postings seem to prove that it's not.

Geoff Hern (M60-80)

10 March 2017

Hi FFoeg.

Age doesn't come itself - it gives years of experience which provides the opportunity for learning transfer - when this is shared in a positive way and helps others it translates to philosophy for me.

I think the majority of Windsorites learnt to help each other to survive the unique circumstances in which we were placed - and yes it gave us an understanding that is sadly lacking in this world today.

For me the other positive experience from my Windsor days is that I do as much as possible (although limited) to protect service users from institutionalised regimes and thinking - Been there, done it, didn't like it (do understand why it was necessary in those circumstances) but can't see why those who are dependent on carers should be subjected to control because people can't be bothered, watch the clock and just want to go home.

Here we have a positive and negative about Windsor in one rant........

I used to know a guy who was called 'Rab the ranter' - please don't let me turn into him!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

12 March 2017

What a great way to start a very wet Sunday morning! Slapped about for misuse of the dreaded ' whilst elsewhere it is suggested I'm in an age group that seemingly means that I'm in need of care. Allow me to recommend two disparate but nonetheless useful books.
Grammar Rules by Craig Shrives, who devotes 8 pages to Apostrophes and in this book points out these are the arch enemy of any computer spell checker! I have since adjusted my google punctuation checker in the vague hope so not to attract the opprobrium of G.H.
As for experience, I recommend Blink by Malcolm Gladwell, who suggests there is no such thing as instinct, it is more the brain thin slicing experience and the adaptive unconscious telling us if something or someone, is right or wrong, good or bad. Relating that wisdom to WBS I ask of myself the question 'where else could one have learnt corporal punishment was wrong and be seeming taught such appalling grammar at the same time'! I can see Henry R shaking his head even now!

John Eustace (M59-62)

12 March 2017

Good morning John Eustace,

Your 'rant' cheered me up on this dreich morning - I'm chuckling as I write this!!!

You said you were saddened at the negative comments about Windsor on the 5th and now you seem to be a tad irate about the place yourself???

There was a time, not long ago, when I didn't have much good to say about my time at WGS but thanks to the wisdom of Geoff Hern I am far more positive about the experience.

The question is this - if you are such an expert in the art of perfect corners on your sheets why do you need a housekeeper to do them for you? Why not you do them yourself?

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

12 March 2017

Geoff Hern - good afternoon, I trust you and Mrs. Hern are well?

John Eustace - I am also intrigued as to why you don't make your own bed after all the WBS training on how to be self sufficient.
I'm assuming, of course that you are well enough to do so. If you aren't, please accept my humble apologies for the wrong assumption.
My wife of 47 years has yet to produce brick sides and envelope corners to the required standard so we invested in duvets!

iZZZi - I have just instructed my children that if they have to throw me into an old folks home they better make sure it is one that does not have fake frivolity at Christmas / birthdays.They are also to ensure that they do not have Vera Lynn, Andrews Sisters and the like music being played on their gramaphones. The home must have a state of the art stereo system (turned up to 11) which only plays vinyl Rock'n'Roll, Soul, Cream, Allman Brothers and the like, Jazz and real Blues. They are also to furnish me with a Sterling 9mm so that I can blast any offending music clean off the turntable in rapid time. Should I become non compos mentis and a drain on resources the Sterling should then be turned on me.

Malcolm Graham (E60-65)

12 March 2017

You could be right Sebrof but I'm sure that showing consideration for others does not only come from your own negative experiences. It does not surprise me at all that Christine is involved with CAB. It will embarrass her I'm sure but she knows that I always found her to be one of the good guys. She has even kept her maths books from those memorable days in Room 8. Only an opinion but I think that ranting (when not overdone) can also be of benefit both to ranter and the recipient of the rant. Rumour has it that I was nicknamed 'hairy' at WBS because of it. Some people need to be told 'how it is' otherwise things won't change. It's an uphill task at times but worth it. I must admit though that those at the BBC, especially in their concentration upon criticising the NHS, are the subject of many of my rants nowadays. These rants produce no results of course apart from making me feel a bit better.
Sorry to have spoilt your wet Sunday John but my observation prompted another post from you which was all part of the cunning plan. Like Sebrof and Malcolm though I wonder about the housekeeper. Sounds a bit posh!!
Malcolm thanks for thinking of us. Yes we are OK apart from not being able to do things that were so easy in the past. Long walks in the hills being something we miss the most.
Hope things are good for you too. Minus the golfball and dozing in the warmth of the wood burner.

Geoff Hern (M60-80)

12 March 2017

Many years ago an Australian professor was asked why, in that country, they didn't have servants or house staff. He replied 'but we do, it's just we call them wives'. Happily, for him, Germaine Greer was not there!
In response to why a housekeeper, it is simply a division of labour at a price commensurate with needs and wants. It might even be, by calling this person a housekeeper, I'm raising the cost, but that is of no concern, when compared to keeping continuity of staff. Maslow's hierarchy of needs here, mate.
Obviously my poor use of English, garnered by 3 years at WBS, is causing concern; in that I'm ambivalent in my judgement of the place. Not so. I'm saying that our judgements are the result of experience and not an intuition of right or wrong. Read the book Blink and you'll understand (note how I slipped in an apostrophe here, but fully in the knowledge misuse of such can damage credibility)
All this in advance of a big match tomorrow night. I can recall 47 years ago watching the replay of the F.A Cup in the window of Pratt's in Streatham, watching as we beat Leeds U. I'd been married three days and Mrs Eustace the 1st, didn't really get it. Full marks for naming the Chelsea side verbatim, no cheating G.H.
My compliments to those who seek to complement my comments!!!!Thanks.

John Eustace (M59-62)

 

12 March 2017

Hi Malcolm

Just for the record if you get 'a gid auld fawkes hame when yir an auld stecky' you will have your own room and there will be separate lounges for those that have alternative tastes at no extra cost.

If the grey matter goes into decline one of three things will happen - it will be pure torment, you'll be happy in your 'own wee world' or somewhere in the middle!!!! Most people in the care profession would prefer to be taken to the vet - a choice that us humans are not allowed while you would be charged with cruelty if you kept an animal alive!!!! Can anyone please tell me what makes humans so superior when we are actually the most damaging species on the planet?????????????

The concept of a housekeeper is quite amusing and brings me some funny memories.............
When my father was serving in Singapore we had an amma (please correct spelling) who taught my sister to roll up balls of rice and throw them into her mouth!!! My mother could not get her to understand that starching babies nappies was a bad idea!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

When we were in Munster in the 60's we had a putz Frau (spelling) called Frau Kreig (no she did not cause the war) paid for by the army.
My mother would not let her clean the bathrooms as she believed this was undignified. When Frau Kreig was pregnant I caught German measles and she didn't want to enter the house but could not afford to lose her pay - my mother told her to stay away and not tell anyone so that she would be paid. When we returned to Germany in the 70's this service was no longer available but that was not a problem to mother. As my father was the Quartermaster responsible for checking vacated houses we had the cleanest house around and mum did it all her self (couldn't be seen to be below par when dad was reaming other folks bahookies).

My OU deadline is looming so I better disappear and get that essay done - can anyone tell me why I put myself through this torment?

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

15 March 2017

Hello Izzi

Never met you but we seem to to be in the same line of work? Had 6 months at the CAB - thought I knew it all after 35 years in welfare form but I learnt so much more - after years of cringing about the CAB I realised how much valuable work they do. It was a great experience.

Christine Willmott (M77-80)

15 March 2017

I would like to give my sincere thanks to the ex-Windsorites for their invaluable input to my OU essay.

AND, thank you to Bill for his support in making it possible.

This site is invaluable and greatly appreciated for more reasons that I can say

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

15 March 2017

Hello izzie, how strange that when I was in Malaya we also had a amma who taught my mum to make ( in my dads eyes ) a proper curry!! something I hate, also strange we also were in Munster in the 60s, I went to York barracks for schooling, and my dad was also a quartermaster sergeant and yes we had a lot of the 'best stuff around'

All the best with you studies and obviously the exam/ test whatever at the end of it.

Robert (Bob) Moore (C62-64)

16 March 2017

Hi Bob, Army life was a strange thing to say the least.

I went to Oxford School which if I recall correctly was at the opposite side of town from York?

I remember Munster as a beautiful place with the Aasee where we fed the swans in summer and sledged in winter when it froze over.
The centre was also stunning with the old buildings and the Church with the clock that had a revolving scene on the hour - can't quite remember what it was though!!!

We had a privileged upbringing compared to my peers here who seem to have had quite harsh conditions - poverty compared to us.
The strange thing is the majority of them are materialistic, always wanting the latest model where I am happy with buy quality and make it last till it has to be replaced.

I find people either don't believe me when I talk bout those days or they think I am a snob - my sister tells me not to talk about it as they don't understand - why should I deny the basics that played such a large part of forming my 'personhood'?

I really don't know what I am studying towards - I started with dementia as it was work related and then death and dying which gave me The End of Life Care Certificate. I them chose mental health as it is also work related - I just pick modules of interest which I may or may not turn into a degree in Social Care.

When I did the CIPD Professional Qualification I committed to 'life long learning' and that is what I intend to do - hopefully it will enhance my grey matter survival rate anyway!!!!!!!!!

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

17 March 2017

Lovely to see non-WGS memories being triggered by messages on the site! We were in Malaya in the early 50s - my father was in the jungle, but we were safe on Penang Island. Our Amah took us to her house and gave us "Indian apples", but she didn't do any cooking that I know of. And we were in Münster 1959-60 - I went to York School, we lived in Gremmendorf. There was a cavalry regiment in the nearby barracks - I loved going to see the horses. From WGS we went on a class trip to Münster and the Aasee. My father was with a tank transporter unit in Münster at that time - it later was transferred to Hamm, and was just over the wall from WGS - but my father had long been posted elsewhere by then. When I first came to London to study in 1968, I soon gave up trying to explain how I had been to 10 schools - only one in the UK - the last one in Germany, yet spoke such good English ;-) The joy of these groups (including facebook) is that we can share our common experiences with people who "understand".

Pamela Ross (StJ63-68)

17 March 2017

Hi Pamela, I also lived in Gremmendorf - Borghorstweg. It was a lovely house with a balcony at the back which looked over a cows field.
To this day I want a balcony like that...........

I have great memories of living in Putney - hate to say it here but it was the best school I ever attended. The Head Master was Asian and very creative. At the end of primary 6 our excursion was a week on the Isle of Wight at a cost of ?14 all in. We had a project to complete while there and on returning we presented a play to the rest of the pupils about the places of interest that we had visited. I still have my project and receipt for ?14.

The other advantage of army life and living in London was attending a Harley Street orthodontist on the NHS.

I best remember dad in his army uniform with the Sam Brown and button polishing each morning. When we were in Putney uniform was not allowed - I still smile when I think of the Crombie, bowler hat and black brolly - the city gent. I much preferred the uniform.

Then there was the 'penguin suit' for the functions - still think they were daft. Anyway, more than enough for now.

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

19 March 2017

Received this today, if anyone would like to help please contact me and I will connect you -

I was a pupil at WGS from 1959-1963 (Head Girl from 62-63). There is to be an exhibition organised by the University of Paderborn in October this year called Briten in Westfalen, telling the story of the British in Germany from 1945 to the present day. As the British Army finally withdraws over there next couple of years, the exhibition will illuminate the important role the British have played in the transformation of post-war Germany. As part of the story, the organisers would very much like to display items of the Windsor school uniform - blazer, scarf, beret, badge etc. It seems that Germans are fascinated by the British boarding school tradition! The project organisers at Paderborn University will will insure all items, and store them safely in the city archives.

I do hope you will be able to help!

With thanks and best wishes

Diana Goldsworthy (formerly Alex Yeadell)

 

ps I have posted it to FaceBook too

19 March 2017

Just been browsing Windsor Facebook page and amazed to see the first item was a photo of a Home Economics ( Domestic Science) note book or jotter with my name written on the top corner. The person who had posted it mentioned still using recipes she had been taught.....possibly by me. It set me wondering how many ex pupils still make and cook things they learnt in H.E. lessons? I still use recipes that I taught!
Do any of you remember the run up to the Christmas Fayre each year? For two weeks we ran a production line making and baking cakes to sell; Lemon Drizzle was a favourite as was Victoria Sandwich. I also churned out Coconut Ice and Fudge! Happy days!!!

Rae Mitchell (was Cleverly) (M77-81)

27 March 2017

Good Morning everybody. It has been a long time since I first visited the site and considered joining, and I was a little dismayed to find that it almost folded. I am glad to see that a solution was found, long may it continue. I do hope that a full membership scheme can be re-established, noting that there has been little or no updates to the main site, reunions, photographs etc since 2011. I am posting a message with a view to making contact with anyone that knew me whilst I was at Windsor Boys between the years of 1977-1980. If anyone would like to contact me, that would be great.

Tony Parslow (H77-80)

27 March 2017

Good Afternoon all you Windsorites, I have some information from Dennis Reeves already, but do any of you know what happened to either John or Jackie Grimes who were at WBS and WGS during the period 77-80 and lived at RAF Laarbruch, the same as myself?

Tony Parslow (H77-80)

28 March 2017

Hi Dave Naylor, l was in Hillsborough girls

Chris Crawford (H64-67)

28 March 2017

Hi all,, For some strange reason this has came into my head and it is annoying me for clarification.

Am I correct in recalling a play being performed in which Joan Gallagher(?) was covered in fake tan and turned out like streaky bacon? And her parents were not happy bunnies?

What was that play? And who were the teachers involved?

Also, can anyone remember doing music lessons at WGS and who the teachers were?

Here's hoping for some discussion on the creative aspects of education that Windsor provided...............

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

28 March 2017

Hm. Music lessons - we must have had them, I certainly had comments in the "music" section of my school reports from time to time! My first music teacher was Mr Purvis, just before he left the school and went to Canada - he had written the school song. We (the school) put on "Hiawatha's Wedding" in four part harmony for Speech Day - I even went and sourced a CD of the music recently, which shows how much impact it made! I was in the school choir and chapel choir - Mr Escott was the music teacher by this time. And was it Miss Graham after he left? I know there were opportunities to take lessons in musical instruments as an extra (and at a cost), and take the relevant grade exams. When CSEs came in, Mr Escott got some of us to take a Music CSE, but I don't think this was timetabled, also as an "extra" after normal school hours. I remember I played Juventino Rosas' "Ueber den Wellen" on my piano accordion as my demonstration piece for the exam.

We certainly learned songs for Speech Days as a school and for Christmas Concerts and for other plays and performances in smaller groups, but I don't really remember music as lessons.

Pamela Ross (StJ63-68)

29 March 2017

Having done a bit of research on music teachers in my "archives" - Miss Graham was after Mr Purvis and before Mr Escott. Miss Keene also taught music and was our housemistress in St James. Apparently it was Miss Murray who was head of music after Mr Escott left. That's about the sum of my knowledge! There was a music room, I believe, on the second floor of the school block - I remember going there with a friend to sing a song for Mr Escott, there was a piano by the window. The same room may also have been used for art?

Pamela Ross (StJ63-68)

29 March 2017

Hi Pamela, et al. It seems music wasn't a big subject at WGS!

I've read the posts about the boy with their guitars - was there more opportunity for lessons at WBS?

If music be the food of love
Play on
Give me excess of it (or what ever it was)
Who wrote this please?????

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

29 March 2017

Pamela's interesting account about the music teachers resident at the girls' school set me thinking about the boys school's equivalents. I recall two.
Mr Loft-Simpson, known as "Lofty" and his infamous "lofty mobile:" a little Citrone Diane, or, at that time, a similar model.
He played the chapel organ and a wry smile would cross boy' faces whenever the hymn " These things shall be a loftier race " was sung. It is funny how so many of the hymns we sang have remained with me word perfect after all these years.

Mr Date followed "Lofty" and, too obviously, he was known as "Daffy." I can thank this gentleman for my love of classical music.

David Grey, I also remember the rather eccentric and highly subjective grade colour code system. Mr Nesbit-Haws (geography) awarded me a "Blue B." No punishment was carried out because they couldn't explain why it would be warranted with a B awarded. Rather strangely I was saddled with a B grade through both "O" and "A" level geography results after leaving Hamm. Thanks Dave I had not thought about this for years. Pamela did they have the same system at the Girls' School?

John Oliver (E60-64)

29 March 2017

Firstly, to answer Izzzi's question regarding the quote - they are the opening lines of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, which we did for O level. I have just remembered - we had a touring theatre group which came and performed that, I think? And as far as music went - plenty of singing in various choirs and for such as Speech Day - musical instruments definitely an "extra" other than possibly recorders (I already played accordion before I went to WGS). I suppose those who wished to get involved usually did so - auditioning for plays, etc.

John - we also had the grading system, blue, grey or red plus the A to E if I remember rightly - the colours for "effort", the letters to indicate attainment. The grade cards were used to award prizes to the "best" house, with a shield awarded once a year.

Pamela Ross (StJ63-68)

29 March 2017

Hi John, Yes we did have the dodgy coloured grades at WGS - red was good (not danger), pencil was average and blue was bad. I still have my card showing a blue E for PE - Miss Beatson awarded me it as she said the only time she ever seen me running was when the bell went for end of period. I went on to be reserve in the cross country team (ulterior motive at play - my boyfriend ran for the boys school and I got the day out when it was inter-school race day!!!).
Said boy was a fit lad and came second out of all the runners.

What Miss Beatson didn't get was how to motivate me - I used to be out doing hurdles at 5 AM in the summer term which I really enjoyed - a bit cooler and sun rising - magic.

The blue E was rebellion I guess.

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

30 March 2017

Well, well, Tony Parslow, how are you doing? Last I heard you had just returned from Cyprus and were living in the Midlands (I think). It's been a long time, I am currently living in Aurora, Colorado (USA), but will be moving to Germany for at least 3 years this summer (my wife is already there). It would be great to catch up, I still remember our backgammon games at the Tech college in the mornings.

John Lynch (C77-80)

30 March 2017

Good Evening iZZi and Pamela, how this site is dredging up deeply buried memories. That grading system for one and it was still current during your years at the school, iZZi. Visions of hurdling at 5AM that is true dedication or madness? That ungodly hour is too reminiscent of my 20 year commute to London. However, it sounded a good way of resisting " the Windsor System." Pam, I've just looked at your mammoth collection of photos you posted on the schools' Face Book site; they put my meagre 8 photos in the shade. The majority are of football teams I played in.

As I spent a term of learning to type at the Girls' School some were familiar. My teacher, Mrs Perkins, said I was the worst pupil she had ever had. I agreed with her and I still type like Blind Pew on the keyboard. Years later I met her son, Geoff Perkins, who I remembered from school: he was a day boy. We both worked for the same organisation and in the same department. We have been firm friends for 41 years and meet at reunions several times a year. Best wishes.

Memo to self. Proof read this before sending.

John Oliver (E60-64)

31 March 2017

Hi John, The hurdle interest was threefold - I had a friend Sue Dawson who was good at sport and enjoyed it, it was a good way to let of steam (which I had an abundance of and still do) and it was rebellion big time - what were they going to do? use it as another way to punish me? probably!!!! Never got caught so we'll never know - if we did get caught it was never mentioned - maybe they thought I was better doing hurdles than a lot of the other stuff I got up to!!!!!!!!!

Sue and I had a falling out as she gained a black eye from somewhere and told folk I had gave her it - I was not happy - I may have been MAD but never violent. As Miss Maynard told me 'you are inebriated with the exuberance of your own verbosity' - hate to say it but I haven't changed in that department!!!!!!!!!!!!

Anyone know what happened to Sue Dawson?????

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

31 March 2017

Good weather is coming which always brings me in mind of "shirt sleeve order". The official sign being displayed in the heads office window. A chance to get rid of the tie and the blazer, both of which proudly displayed the term to date's menu. The first time the Rev. JJ Fielding shot past the dining block on his bike, with an open necked shirt. NO DOG COLLAR! Did that mean no Compline this evening? No chance! Yes Geoff, Summer, but I also remember the rollicking you gave me for wearing a shirt with no top button and what you described as a piece of red string as my tie. I was proud of that tie - it had the smallest knot possible - all because someone had forgotten to display "shirt sleeve order" one morning.

Malcolm Graham (E60-65)

 
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