<<<<< CLICK ON HERE TO POST YOUR OWN MESSAGE >>>>> 

1 Nov 2016

Geoff, what's NSD challenge .?
You know when you are asked a security question on your phone or bank etc ....I wonder how many when asked "who was your favourite teacher?" Would , like me have answered
Mr. Hern !
It took me 3 goes to pass my maths O level , you never gave up where others would have.
I didn't enjoy maths lessons at all as I so rubbish . I did enjoy DofE and got silver and gold ......I enjoyed footy with you ( if I was on your side ) , sailing camp, and trips to the Hartz Mountains.
Your a bit of a legend when alls said and done Sir !

Ralph Bennett (M61-68)

1 Nov 2016

Hi Geoff, belated birthday wishes to you too. I had a birthday weekend so unable to post. I have had a busy year with A levels, results and sorting out University for my son. I am enjoying the peace and quiet now. We spent the summer visiting every athletic track known to man (not really but it felt like it!) including Yeovil, Bedford and Nottingham. We go because my son is an athlete, it's not some weird stadium fetish. I hope you are keeping well. I am enjoying your posts especially this last month.

With regards to my time at WGS, on arrival I hated it. I didn't start until mid October so I was behind straight away. All my lessons were at the boys school so invariably due to the minibus I was quite often late. The teachers I had were among the best in my opinion, Mr Hern for maths and Mr Hughes for geography. As time went on I found that mostly because of my involvement in sport life there got better. There was always something to get involved in. It's only now later in life that I've realised they were some of the best years and if only I could do it all again. I am still in touch with Virginia Kitchen, Denise Fletcher, Elizabeth Taylor, Alison Close and Christine Ost. I can't recall too many more people these days apart from the sporty people.

Geoff, I hope you had a great birthday, I will be in touch next year!,

Linda Le-Cun (B76-79)

 

1 Nov 2016

Hi Geoff, I did enjoy reading the article.

I think your classes might have caught my interest back then because from the photos I can vaguely remember you from DofE in a classroom at the boys school. We were there to plan an orienteering expedition. One of the lads in our group was good at working things out so we walked half the route then went to the pub. We only drank cola and had a great laugh. When we questioned the lad if we would get into trouble he said the teacher would be all right with it!!! Would that have been you?

I love Lord Sugar and Anne Robinson (The Weakest Link) for their caustic remarks - shows how bad my sense of humour is!!!

I must be honest and say I have no idea what most of your acronyms stand for - what is NSD please?

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

1 Nov 2016

Just been revisiting Erving Goffman's 'total institution' as part of my OU module and refers to the lunatic asylums of what should be bygone days!?! (not to my experience of working in the care sector)'

'Should a person reside in such a system it encompasses his or her whole being. It undercuts the residents individuality. It disregards his or her dignity. It subjects the level of regimental pattern of life that has nothing to do with the persons own desires and inclinations. And is inescapable.'

I thought my rebellious nature had enabled me to escape being a victim of this within WGS but throughout my life I have been told I am over regimented and 'institutionalised'. Some who have told me that have been mental health workers although I have never been in a mental health setting other than for employment.

Another interesting fact is that those asylums preferred to recruit ex military staff as they had the regimentation that was required to run the asylums both socially and in the work settings.

While routine and stability may be welcomed and even necessary for some in residential settings it is detrimental to others and unfortunately I see that on a daily basis. I love the residents who buck the system - they make my day interesting and worthwhile.

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

3 Nov 2016

Thanks Ralph for your very warm words. The sort of warmth that Hamm students were very good at showing to us teachers who were 'just doing their jobs'. I, as is obvious, have great memories of those early days in spite of the rather rigid regime and it is comforting that many lads have too. NSD challenges? Pay attention Bennett! You are not in the Maths block now. As already explained in a previous post they were problems designed to make 'em think, take a risk, learn from their mistakes and to ask 'where can we go from here?'.

NSD stands for Not So Difficult. I love and always used acronyms they made students come out and ask what they mean, as you did, and that lead to 'discussion'. Maybe IZZi I should write a dictionary of them. Only drank Coke eh? Pull the other one.


Thanks Linda too for your good wishes but how could you possibly put your own birthday celebrations before mine? (Just a joke everybody!). I do remember you arriving in the middle of the term. It must have been more than daunting not only to be at a boarding school but at the same time being the only young lady to be taught with a bunch of rough lads 'up the road'. I hope that we made you 'feel at home' and glad that you were able to take advantage of the wide range of opportunities on offer. You were one of the later ones but I also often wonder whether other WGS Maths or D of E pioneers read this site. The real groundbreaker Carole Todd posted at one time but what about others such as Sally Pennington, Carole Buchanan and so on? Christine of course as a holder of the Bicycle Saddle Trophy can always be relied upon. How's that Christine? A compliment!!

Geoff Hern (M60-80)

3 Nov 2016

Hi Geoff,

I think it would be an excellent idea for you to do a wee dictionary of your abbreviated sayings on this site. I am sure that it would be of interest and bring some productive discussions. It would also bring back memories for those you taught who may have some good tales to share. Bring it on please.........

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

4 Nov 2016

Mr Hern - I will take that as a compliment - I was proud to be the holder of the Bicycle Saddle Trophy - probably the only achievement I had in Maths!! A memorable experience which will not be forgotten!! And I have still got my head around binary although I am reliably informed that it is the basis for a lot of computing programmes these days??

Christine Willmott (M77-80)

4 Nov 2016

The trophy was not your only achievement in maths by any means Christine. For example you were also a member of the select band of WGS young ladies who braved the rigours of Room 8 the WBS Maths block. An achievement in itself considering the craziness you could expect to meet there. And don't worry about binary, just use the computer as I, and most people, do and leave how it works to the cleverer folk. Any of my acronyms in your maths books? I'm remain amazed that your still have them.

Geoff Hern (M60-80)

4 Nov 2016

Hi iZZi Had to think a bit before making this post as I did not mean putting the acronyms on here but, in jest. publishing them as you had suggested I should do for my so-called 'methods' in an earlier post. Not at all sure that this is the place for them as they seem more than a little silly and even boring out of context and may also upset one or two people. But obeying orders here goes anyway with a few samples. Remember that they were intended to produce humour and discussion. Fingers crossed that they stir a few memories. They took the form of either an acronym or drawing or sometimes both.
P. Y. F. O. - when 'encouraging' someone to work harder
H. V. M. - on a long-winded solution to a problem
A drawing of a violin, cello or double-bass. (No acronym)
A. G. E. - on a prep or piece of work.
Make of them what you will but I'll be surprised if many remember this quirk of mine.

Geoff Hern (M60-80)

4 Nov 2016

Fiddle/cello/double bass = fiddled the answer, not showing the workings or guessing. (is this the real reason I have played the bass for many years?)
L.A.C. = Let air circulate, scrawled across too much writing crammed into a small space.
H.V.M. = Hamm via Moscow?
Yup, I remember a few, Geoff.

Malcolm Graham (E60-65)

5 Nov 2016

Hello Mr Hern - yes I do have my maths books - locked away in a Harry Potter trunk that my mum used in 1956 when she sailed from Southampton to Singapore to join my dad!! My dad worked there with Martin Potts dad and Andy Richards dad. When we visited Vietnam and Singapore last year we went to where my parents lived in Singapore - opposite a golf course and down the road from the Raffles Hotel. The property is now owned by a Dutch banker and has barbed wire all around it. When Thomas (my eldest son) was in Vietnam and Cambodia last year, he flew to Singapore and stayed with Martin for a few days - apparently they tried to scale the fences of the property but to no avail. No sure Martin should really be doing that at 56 yrs old!!

H.V.M I had many times as well as a map of the world - apparently I had gone the long round and probably still not got the right answer!!

The maths books will be treasured!!

P.S. Do you have any contact with Jeanette Le Cunn?? My dad also worked with her dad at Laarbruch, who persuaded my dad to buy a Passat - I am sure he worked in the vehicle section of the RAF. I remember Linda being very involved in athletics - shot put?? Jeanette has more my age and I was in contact with her a few years ago but that seems to have diminished??

Christine Willmott (M77-80)

6 Nov 2016

So glad to see your post Malcolm. I was beginning to wonder if the golf ball was still giving difficulty. Glad too that you managed 50% on the 'quirks'. So for one person at least they were memorable and after 50 years too! Still two to go though. P.Y.F.O.? Maybe you have never seen it as it only appeared on work showing signs of a lack of effort but surely you saw A.G.E. and L.A.C was one of the early ones which I first used as a greenhorn in England in 1959. Still not at all sure about posting any more of them as they'll only really be of interest if any to those I happened to teach.
Christine I do not know Jeanette but if Linda reads this then maybe she can help. Not much help to you am I? First with the Black Forest and now with Jeanette.
1977 Passat? Best car I have ever owned and it was still going strong when I sold it in 1993.

Geoff Hern (M60-80)

6 Nov 2016

Hi Malcolm, Good to see you back in action. How's the jaw? All good I hope

Hi Geoff,

PYFO - pull you finger out?
AGE - a good example?

I remember Carole Todd - what did she do to become a ground breaker?
My best memory of her was telling us our name back to front- hers was Elorac Ddot - strange the things you remember!!!
I also remember her pulling me out of trouble. There were no rough books available so I was using my writing pad to make notes in prep. I was hauled on to the stage for writing letters and the teacher (can't remember who) didn't believe me. Carole backed me up and I escaped detention THANK YOU Carole.

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

7 Nov 2016

Mornin' all. Thanks for your concern - the golf ball has reduced to the size of a Smartie thanks to the antibiotics but the "experts" are now not sure if this could possibly be a medical problem, not a dental problem. More tests next week...Geoffs acronyms: I can't remember getting an A.G.E. but I should have got loads of'em if it means A Good Effort. ;D. I will admit Geoff that I did use the violin a few years ago in our maintenance engineers log book when I discovered that the bu88ers had bypassed a troublesome valve on a cooling circuit and not admitted to the fact. I checked in this morning (I retired 6 years ago) and they still haven't worked out what it means. Hah!... and I'm not tellin'.

Malcolm Graham (E60-65)

7 Nov 2016

iZZZi (Elorac couldn't have done much with iZZZi could she?). As with most things the name iZZZi (why three Zs?) reminds me of sums since palindromic numbers can yield interesting things. OK I know. Boring!!
Carole was a ground-breaker because she was the first young lady to do A Level in the WBS Maths block. Caused quite a stir with the lads the first time that she arrived in the minibus. Wow and she was responsible for yet another good thing that happened to you at WGS. Be careful the list is getting longer! However I do like Allebasi Sebrof (sounds like a Russian pianist or revolutionary). Flows off the tongue. Very mysterious and much better than Ffoeg Nreh which at best could be someone being sick. Yes you're right it's strange the 'odd' things that we remember.
N.A.B.E. with the acronyms since you were spot on with 'pull your finger out' but the E is wrong in the A.G.E. However it looks as if you would have been on the same slightly-weird wavelength. A popular one with the students was T.A.T.C. usually put on a very silly/careless mistake. One student Copenhagen was so impressed that after receiving it she thereafter always signed herself as TATC instead of Disha.
Malcolm 'a good effort' it is. As for using the violin they say that 'Imitation is the the sincerest form of flattery' so I consider myself as flattered although I would not go as far as Oscar Wilde. FYI The acronyms have also been used by a former IB student of mine, he assures me, when training Israeli Fighter pilots. Let's hope that the tests sort out the golf ball once and for all and quickly.
Sorry again everybody as I am posting too much.

Geoff Hern (M60-80)

7 Nov 2016

Well done Carole!! I think I caused a stir at WBS but not for the same reasons!! And I am sure that Mr Harris (ex History teacher) and Mr McGowan would endorse that, after several tellings off outside the school gates and on the train going home where I was severely reprimanded. And it was on the school bus that I first met Martin Potts who was desperately trying to control a load of WGS and WBS children to no avail.Thankfully it has maintained our friendship for nearly 40 years!!And I was one of the 'good girls'!!
Mr Hern - thank you for your comments regarding the Black Forest and Jeanette Le Cunn.was a great help!!

Christine Willmott (M77-80)

7 Nov 2016

I paid a visit to the site of WBS in September. As I'm sure everyone knows only the chapel and dining block are left which is ironic as when I was at WBS they would have been top of my list for demolition. I was at WBS from 77-79 when my father was stationed in Hanover. We had lived in Hamm a few years earlier when I attended the primary school and it was great to see my old house at Am Huckenholz.

Looking back at posts I see there has been discussion about those of us who don't always have fond memories of the place. For me it was the worst two years of my childhood. Part of that was due to the regimented structure and focus on sports. I hated football and resented being forced to play on a weekend. I also witnessed significant bullying. I recognise that teachers couldn't be everywhere and when you stick a load of teenage boys together there are going to be issues. Mostly though, I just didn't want to live apart from my parents and that was a major issue for me at 12 years old. Having said that, it wasn't all bad and I do remember a few good times.

Michael Cutts (M77-79)

7 Nov 2016

Hi Geoff, et al

Back then I was either Isabel or Isy - the ZZZ cane in because most people think I'm half asleep most of the time!!!

FFoeg Nreh sounds like a village in Wales to me!!!

AGE - a good effort?
TATC - take a think clown?

NABE - not another botched effort?

Allebasi Sebrof was and is definitely a revolutionary who might even be related to Rasputin.
First year high school Dundee - was sent for piano lessons with teacher who was visually impaired but had amazing special awareness. If I went to touch wrong keys she would grab my hands and bang them down in the correct place - 3 lessons and I never went back. STILL TERRIFIED OF PIANOS!!!

Hope they get Malcolm's jaw sorted out ASAP - it seems to have been going on forever.....

Bet Elorac caused a stir at the boys school - see to remember she was a fine looking lady.

Allebasi Sebrof

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

11 Nov 2016

Hi everybody......just obtained my own laptop.....never realy wanted one...been talked into it by my son..so this by way of a practice. ALSO...it will give my old cell mate Geoff Macpate the chance of a breather as he seems to write a monthly piece most months.Ialso mention SLIM Greenwood who a while ago said he was missing us all from his time at WS...assuming any of us were still kicking.Ive said in the passed how much I value my time at WS its made an ever lasting impact on my life and always will.....cue violins....Im making no excuses for this rather poor attempt...if I go back and do correctins well be here for ever....due to time of year Ill finish wishing you all Happy Xmas...

TINY Latham (S54-57)

Just a reminder to all - if you want anyone to contact you then you need to fill in your email address. It will only be used by me to contact you giving you the email address of the person who wants to contact you, how you proceed from there is up to you. The email addresses are not used for any other purpose - if I don't have your email then you won't get a contact from any of your old pals.

14 Nov 2016

Michael Cutts - I remember you well as a fellow student who hated sports. Consequently,in the 6th form, I had the option to drop sports and do country dancing instead, which I did!!

Mr Hern - I have just received a call from my husband who is away with with work this week - said he thought of me as he had to do a computer configuration in BINARY..............he said you must tell your old maths teacher as he will be impressed............which I was not!!

Christine Willmot (M77-80)

15 Nov 2016

Sebrof I thought you'd like to the 'revolutionary' bit!! I put it in just for you. But related to Rasputin. No way. Anyway he wasn't a revolutionary - 'once a teacher ........'.
Both TATC and NABE are wrong but your suggestions are just as good. NABE is 'not a bad effort' so on the way to A.G.E. I'll wait a little before revealing T.A.T.C. as I know that my acronyms are a very niche market and of little interest to others in the WBS book of memories.
Christine please thank your husband for thinking of me even when he's away from home and missing you!! But, as I've said before, I would not have included binary numbers in a Maths course either. It makes it appear that computers are solely for Mathematics nerds. One of my biggest failures remains in not persuading you to like Maths just a little.

Geoff Hern (M60-80)

16 Nov 2016

Mr Hern - sad but true - after 29 years of marriage, obviously yourself and BINARY comes before me!! Was not a failure on your part to persuade me to like Maths despite your massive efforts!! But do not worry - I have 1 husband and 2 boys that present a constant reminder of what I have apparently missed out on..........
Shame 2 of them fail to sort out their handwriting, and the other, his hair - but horses for courses!!

Christine Willmott (M77-80)

19 Nov 2016

Mr Hern- husband home - my husband also had to address some other computer nodes in hexadecimal, but didn't dare go there on that one!!! Any comments??

Christine Willmot (M77-80)

19 Nov 2016

I wonder if Tiny Latham remembers the great times some of us had roller skating at the weekends in 1954/5? There was a large asphalted area behind the school hall which we used as a race track.
The big debate at the time among the "cognoscenti" was whether to choose HUDORA or POLAR SOLO roller skates and whether these should have the large or small wheel option.
I guess we outgrew the sport as we moved up the school!

Geoff McPate (S53-57)

20 Nov 2016

Christine. Why don't you listen to your 'lads'? There must be something in this sums lark. Surrounded by it for many years but still immune to its beauty after all this time. Not 'horses for courses' but more like 'you can lead a horse to water ...' perhaps!! Wise decision not to go there on the hexadecimal though.
What's happened to Allebasi? No posts since Nov 7th. Is it the OU or have we done something to upset you?

Geoff Hern (M60-80)

20 Nov 2016

Hi FFoeg, This tough old boot ain't that easy upset and would tell you if I was!!!!

My OU assignment is due on 30/11 but that is me finished it - well behind with the course work though!!!!

Had to finish the hand in because I started a new job on 14/11 and didn't know how muck time I would have. Hung up meds keys and exchange them for steelies and hi-viz because I couldn't watch any more bad practice and zero getting done about it. Made Public Interest Disclosure before I left the building and it is being investigated at present - one colleague said 'they've got dementia so it doesn't matter'!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! CAN YOU SMELL THE SMOKE?????

Anyway hope you are all well and Malcolm has got to the bottom of the gobstopper????

8:30 to 16:30 means early to bed which I dislike with a passion but that's life folks'

Tarra for a bit - Allebasi Sebrof

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

22 Nov 2016

The Kiwi's are coming! Saturday 3rd December, 12 noon, Rendezvous Hotel, Brisbane - opposite Brisbane Central Railway Station. Come and say G'day over lunch to Linda Wright, Jean Page, Doreen Watson - Kensington and Hillsborough girls 1960-1965. Keen to catch up with fellow Windsorites whilst in Ozz and enjoy some of our Queensland hospitality, surf and sunshine. Contact Donna Wilson nee Williams H61-65. 0423853173 - email - donna.beatlesfan@gmail.com

Donna Wilson nee Williams (H61-65)

Hope it goes well - I would really like to be there......

22 Nov 2016

Mr Hern - I always 'hear' the lads but do not 'listen'..something I am fairly sure you would endorse!!

As for ALLEBASI - had to google it as I have never heard of the word!! Something to do with wooden toys - Able, Love, Luster, Expressive, Brilliance, Accomplished, Strength, Impressive???

Christine Willmot (M77-80)

23 Nov 2016

Hi Christine,

Your suggestions for Allebasi are way to complex but I love them!!!
On 7/11 I recalled Carole Todd getting us to say our names backwards - Elorac Ddot - so Ffoeg (th Welsh village) decided to call me Allebasi as you can't do much with iZZZi. Back then it would have Ysi - I changed it to Z X 3 as a lot of folk think I'm half asleep most of the time but it's all an act to escape from conversations that don't wish to participate in!!! A big bit naughty but it get's me through the day in a more satisfactory way.

Malcolm,

How is the mouth? I hope it's getting better fast. Have they got a proper diagnosis yet?

Allebasi Sebrof (E72-75)

24 Nov 2016

I think that Allebasi Sebrof sounds like an exotic Russian spy - ah! So is that what you were up to all those years ago at WGS? ;-)

It occurred to me that this weekend (or its equivalent) would have been a visiting weekend at school - the last weekend in November. As well as being visiting weekend, we also put on a Christmas Fair in the gym when I was at WGS (1963-8), our house (St James) would have spent the previous few weeks working with Mrs Ingle, the Bursar's wife, putting together Christmas logs. Real chunks of wood, decorated with paint, holly leaves and decorations, etc to sell at the Fair. It is only now that I wonder what the money raised by the Fair was for - possibly school funds, to cover stuff that BFES didn't pay for - trips out or similar? And of course, that weekend would include whatever Christmas concert we were putting on, so that parents up for the visiting weekend could come and admire their daughters performing on stage. I mostly worked backstage on those shows while I was at WGS, building sets, doing lighting and sound. Sadly, my parents were never able to come to any of the s
hows, even when I was actually performing.

First Sunday in Advent this weekend - we would have a wreath up in our Common Room and light the first candle and sing the first carols.

I'm sure some of these things will ring a bell with some of you.

Pamela Ross (StJ63-68)

24 Nov 2016

iZZZie, Geoff et al. Thank you for your concern - the mouth / jaw is improving. Antibiotics have worked, scan done and just waiting for the interpretation and result. I guess if there's anything sinister I would have been told by now.
Binary stuff - interesting to read Geoffs comments. I seem to remember that it it was Pud Watson more than Geoff who championed binary notation and computers. See my previous posts about the visit to Krefeld and the school telephone exchange. These were led by Pud.

Malcolm Graham (E60-65)

25 Nov 2016

Hi Malcolm,

Glad to hear you mouth is getting better and the antibiotics are doing what they are supposed to. Please don't tell me they are Amoxcillin? It would break my heart!!!

Hi FFoeg,

You asked me to post the positive - here's something weird - I was in a room of about 40 folk and I mentioned the infamous Binary numbers - only one other person in the room could remember doing them at school!!!! As much as I hated them and still don't understand them at least they stuck in mmy 'dunderheid' and I know what they are. Well done Mr Sarney!!!

Question - who invented Binary numbers? Allebasi

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

26 Nov 2016

Allebasi It's a great shame, to say the least, to hear that circumstances forced you to give up on the meds. Your sort of caring seems to me to be what is needed and not the obvious callousness you saw from others.
Well done Mike Sarney indeed yet another happy memory. Now, and only because you asked, the binary system was invented or discovered (whether maths was invented or discovered is open to debate by philosophers) by the German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz and published in 1703. He also invented calculus independently of Newton and we use his notation, and not Newton's clumsier fluxions today.
I know that you're yearning to find out that T.A.T.C. meant 'thick as they come'. You had to be there to know that this was not nasty but all part of the fun.
Malcolm so glad to hear that the golfball is responding to treatment. Yes Granville was far more keen than I was about the place of computing on the maths syllabus and of course Computing and IT deservedly became a separate subject soon after.
Apologies for the maths everybody but blame Sebrof and Mloclam (Carole has a lot to answer for!). I know that some of you do not like it but not Christine as it was she who started this Binary thread not me!!

Geoff Hern (M60-80)

27 Nov 2016

Hi Geoff Carole Todd did have a lot to answer for but all my memories of her are good.

TACT could definitely have been applied to me back then - not because I couldn't but because I wouldn't!!! If I could go back to school and apply myself I would be a dentist as reshaping teeth fascinates me and always has - I had 3 three braces as a kid.

You should not apologise for talking maths - I hate the subject but all this 'trivia' is great for quizzing and hopefully keeping the dementia away!!! I committed to 'life long learning' when I did my CIPD Professional Qualification and that needs to be on work and personal levels.
I wonder if Leibniz visualised a computer back in 1703? If he did he was a far sighted dude!!!

Has anyone got interesting plans for the festive season? I'm hibernating until it is all over - bahhhh humbug!!!!!!!!!!!!

Sebrof

iZZZi Forbes (E72-75)

28 Nov 2016

The great FLOOD in the 1960s has attracted many posts over the years but who remembers the great PLAGUE of 1954?
In the winter of that year a large number of us were infected with scabies and/or impetigo. Our sores were daubed with some purple/violet paint and we were all confined in the sick bay which was located above the dining block(there were only two houses at this time)
We were all fit and healthy apart from being infectious and so did not take readily to the confinement which lasted about a week.
If I remember correctly the whole school, including the 200/250 pupils- girls and boys, was SCRUBBED!

Geoff McPate (S53-57)

28 Nov 2016

Mr Hern - Good for Leibniz!! Glad to hear that it was thought of before the days of digital computing? Do you know who invented Base 36? Now used to address intelligent machines? Food for thought!!

Obviously, this is all from 'the lads' but thought it would keep you on your toes!! Do not want to present you with the bicycle saddle.....

Christine Willmot (M77-80)

29 Nov 2016

I have just discovered that the Leibniz biscuit was named after the mathematician. Still learning stuff at my advanced age!

Well, izzzy, up till last week I would have said yes, I have some "interesting" plans for Christmas, but luckily my daughter phoned this week to say she has managed to get Boxing Day off so we are no longer having to spend the day driving her back to London and then home again - a minimum eight hour round trip. But when I was going through my "bah humbug" phase a few years ago, I took my youngest daughter for a week long coach trip to Austria - horse-drawn sleigh ride in the snow, visit to the Bavarian fairy-tale castles. Made me re-evaluate the time of year and try and get the most out of it. After all, I can always turn the TV off and do other stuff :-) Alternatively, you can celebrate it as Yule or a whole variety of ancient mid-winter festivals.

Pamela Ross (StJ63-68)

29 Nov 2016

Christine
Hexadecimals? A bit of research was needed as I did not have a clue but it appears that there are two possibles
1. Invented in 1770 in France by Mervin because he had 8 fingers on each hand. He was a famous wizard and a counselor to Charlemagne.
2. Johan Vilhelm Nyström a Swede who in the USA in 1859 proposed a base 16 system.
'You pays yer money and takes yer choice'. I like the Mervin story best but your lads obviously know.
Following on from Pamela's end-of-term story. One of the highlights for some just before Christmas was the joint carol service in the Pauluskirche where we were on show to the local dignitories. On one occasion I had the nerve - conned and spurred-on by Pete Stephens - to play by numbers a trombone in the brass band. Luckily we were in the organ loft so all the 'bum' notes went unnoticed or at least nobody knew who to blame. Closest that I ever came to playing an instrument. Something I've always longed to do.
Malcolm how's that golfball?

Geoff Hern (M60-80)

29 Nov 2016

Some time before the Sinclair ZX80 came on the scene I had the dubious pleasure of programming my homemade computer in hexadecimal - I didn't get a line assembler or MS Basic until later as they were horrendously expensive. All of the processor commands were hexadecimal numbers, a line assembler allowed you to use neumonics for the commands and of course Basic was nearer to plain english.

Bill Craswell (C62-65)

29 Nov 2016

Mr Hern . . . ( in a Monty Python accent ), "Aye, machine code . . . tell that to the kids tud - day, and they won't believe you "

Christine Willmot (M77-80)

<<<<< CLICK ON HERE TO POST YOUR OWN MESSAGE >>>>>